singing in the rain

girl, 19, finland. High school student, singer, theatre freak. Loves arts & travelling.

Maybe somethings don’t get better, but we do. We get stronger. We learn to live with our situations as messy and ugly as they are. We fix what we can and we adapt to what we can’t. Maybe some of us will never be fully okay, but at least we’re here. We’re still trying. We’re doing the best we can. That’s worth celebrating too. If you’re reading this, congratulations, you made it to today. You made it.

mjwatson:

If you claim to be a feminist and you shame girls for wanting to do traditional things like take their husband’s last name or be a house wife then you are doing it all completely wrong.

Feminism isn’t an elite group who defeats gender norms, it’s a group who accepts ALL women’s choices.

(via showtuna)

  • Today, I was wearing a floor length skirt. There's this fantastic girl in my 3rd grade class who is Egyptian, and wears a hijab and a long skirt everyday. There are a few other Muslim kids, but most of the girls don't dress like that. She is the only one in her class who wears it every day.
  • Girl: I like your skirt!
  • Me: Thank you!
  • Girl: I'm surprised that you are wearing a long skirt.
  • Me: ... Why?
  • Girl: Because you are cool. And long skirts are weird. The other kids call me weird for wearing a long skirt every day.
  • Me: I don't think long skirts are weird. I think they are cool. And pretty. And fancy.
  • Girl: (turns to the class and yells) EVERYBODY! I'M NOT WEIRD, I'M FANCY!

fishingboatproceeds:

During my time in Ethiopia, I met many people who rely on health care outposts like the one seen in the bottom two pictures here. Through these outposts, children and families get vaccines, diagnoses, and treatment for diseases like diarrhea and pneumonia.

But most of these families, and most of their health care facilities, don’t have regular access to clean water. When I asked people about their greatest needs, almost all of them—from the Women’s Health Army volunteers to children—cited clean water first.

More than 45 million Ethiopians live without clean water. I spoke to women who walk miles every other day with heavy jerrycans to get drinking water for their families. The people I met explained how lack of clean water is a health problem, a financial problem, and a family problem.

So for the next week nerdfighteria is teaming up with water.org to raise money to build sustainable wells so that more than 4,000 people in Ethiopia can have clean water. Please join me in donating—or, if you can’t, in spreading the word. Thanks, and DFTBA.

UPDATE: Bill Gates has pledged to match the fundraiser if we hit our goal of $100,000 for Ethiopia.